Tui Shou

Tui Shou

Tui Shou is the double push hands practice. Push hands is a two-person exercise that is practiced to develop the practitioners “listening” skills or “yin” energy sensitivity, as well as to learn how to apply several applications from the forms. Students start off learning a single-handed push hands exercise called, Dan Tui Shou.

Dan Tui Shou develops crucial waist turning movements and yin energy sensitivity that allows the practitioner to move out of the way of incoming force rather than to confront it with opposing strength.

There are many single handed push hands exercises involving different circular paths and stances. Dan Tui Shou or Single Hand Push Hands allows one to play in a non-combative and safe way with another, but in a way that builds a strong foundation for powerful combative applications. This practice is followed by Shuang Tui Shou Xiao Lu Ding Bu or Paired/Double Push Hands Little Pull Fixed Step.

This exercise adds a new element of attack and defense using both hands and students are taught how to use the four primary energies of Tai Ji Quan; Peng, Liu, Ji, and An, also known as “grasp the birds tail.” Following this lesson, students are taught Shuang Tui Shou Xiao Lu Huo Bu Paired/Double Push Hands Little Pull Moving Step and Shuang Tui Shou Da Lu Paired or Double Push Hands Big Pull. These practices simply expand on the practitioner’s foundation, where they learn new applications that are available to them when the push hands game has evolved to include advancing and retreating stepping patterns. Further applications are taught at this stage, allowing the student to get a feel for how Tai Ji feels when used with martial intention.

Following this lesson, students are taught Shuang Tui Shou Xiao Lu Huo Bu Paired or Double Push Hands Little Pull Moving Step and Shuang Tui Shou Da Lu Paired or Double Push Hands Big Pull. These practices simply expand on the practitioner’s foundation, where they learn new applications that are available to them when the push hands game has evolved to include advancing and retreating stepping patterns. Further applications are taught at this stage, allowing the student to get a feel for how Tai Ji feels when used with martial intention.